Events

Saturday 9 October, 19.00

Film Screening

Bush House (N) Auditorium, -1.01, KCL

Register

Film Screening: Queens of Amathus

An award-winning documentary about the women of Cyprus and their journey to Birmingham in the aftermath of the 1974 Turkish invasion of the island. To be followed by a discussion with the producer and director, Panikos Panayiotou, led by Dr Marios Psaras, Cultural Counsellor, Cyprus High Commission.

Watch the trailer:

Venue: Bush House, 30 Aldwych, London, WC2B 4BG (Bush House (N) Auditorium -1.01 and Arcade Café and exhibition area). Please adhere to all necessary health precautions, as required on the King’s Strand campus.

Organised by the Cultural Section of the Cyprus High Commission, London, and the Centre for Hellenic Studies at King’s.

Register here.

Contact: Dr Marios Psaras, Cultural Counsellor, Cyprus High Commission


Wednesday 13 October

Niki Marangou Memorial Lecture

Temporary Exhibition Room, Leventis Gallery

Nicosia, Cyprus

Third Annual Niki Marangou Memorial Lecture

Prof Roderick Beaton: ‘Το ’21 και ο ευρωπαϊκός φιλελληνισμός’

Painting by Niki Marangou

Please note this lecture is in Greek.

Read the Abstract

Από τις πρώτες κιόλας μέρες της Επανάστασης, η έκκληση προς τα «πολιτισμένα έθνη της Ευρώπης» εμφανίζεται στις πρώτες προκηρύξεις των επαναστατών. Τόσο ο Αλέξανδρος Υψηλάντης στις παραδουνάβιες ηγεμονίες, όσο και ο Πετρόμπεης Μαυρομιχάλης στην Καλαμάτα, καλούν τους φιλελεύθερους και τους φιλάνθρωπους της Ευρώπης να υποστηρίξουν τον Αγώνα. Οι «φιλέλληνες», όπως αποκαλούνται αμέσως, κατεβαίνουν από όλα τα μέρη της ηπείρου, καθώς και από την μακρινή Αμερική. Πάνω από 1000 άτομα πήραν ενεργό μέρος ως εθελοντές στο πεδίο της μάχης. Άλλοι απογοητεύτηκαν και έφυγαν, άλλοι σκοτώθηκαν ή πέθαναν από αρρώστιες. Οι απώλειες ήταν τρομερές, και τραγικές – όπως γίνεται στην πασίγνωστη περίπτωση του Λόρδου Βύρωνα, ο οποίος πέθανε στο Μεσολόγγι τον Απρίλη του 1824. Είναι ζήτημα τι κατάφεραν οι άνθρωποι αυτοί, αν υπολογίσουμε μόνο το στρατιωτικό αποτέλεσμα της επέμβασής τους. Αλλά, μαζί με πολύ περισσότερους ομοϊδεάτες τους που έμειναν σπίτι αλλά που ενεργούσαν με πλάγιους τρόπους, όπως με χρηματοδοτήσεις, πληροφόρηση μέσα από τις εφημερίδες κλπ., οι φιλέλληνες ως σύνολο εξασφάλισαν την κινητοποίηση των κυβερνήσεων των Μεγάλων Δυνάμεων προς όφελος της Ελλάδας. Αν δεν ήταν οι εθελοντές που πήραν τα άρματα, και αν δεν ήταν οι προπαγανδιστικές ενέργειες των φιλελλήνων σε όλες, σχεδόν, τις χώρες της Ευρώπης, δεν θα γινόταν η ναυμαχία του Ναυαρίνου, ή το Πρωτόκολλο του Λονδίνου, που τελικά εξασφάλισε την πλήρη ανεξαρτησία του νεοσύστατου ελληνικού κράτους στις 3 Φεβρουαρίου 1830.

 

The year 2021 marks the bicentenary of the outbreak of the Greek Revolution, or War of Independence. As that anniversary year evolves, this talk takes a long view, beginning with the European settlement reached at the Congress of Vienna in 1814-15, known as the ‘Concert of Europe’, and continuing with the disappearance of multi-national empires and their replacement throughout the continent by the nation states that we are familiar with today. International recognition for Greece as a sovereign nation-state, sealed by the Protocol of London in February 1830, according to Professor Beaton’s analysis, represents a pivotal point in this continent-wide transition, and one that has been unjustly overlooked by historians. The talk will focus on those aspects of the Greek Revolution that explain how events in Greece in the 1820s contributed to this far-reaching change, whose consequences are still being played out today as the UK has left the European Union and its constituent nations contemplate separate futures for themselves.

Prof. Roderick Beaton, A.G. Leventis Visiting Professor in Greek

Ο Roderick Beaton γεννήθηκε και μεγάλωσε στο Εδιμβούργο της Σκωτίας. Σπούδασε Αγγλική Φιλολογία στο Peterhouse (Πανεπιστήμιο του Cambridge) και στη συνέχεια εκπόνησε διδακτορική διατριβή στο ίδιο πανεπιστήμιο με θέμα το ελληνικό δημοτικό τραγούδι. Από το 1988 ώς το 2018 ήταν καθηγητής στην Έδρα Κοραή Νεοελληνικής και Βυζαντινής Ιστορίας, Γλώσσας και Φιλολογίας στο King’s College London, και από το 2012 ώς το 2018 διευθυντής του Κέντρου Ελληνικού Σπουδών στο ίδιο πανεπίστημιο, όπου από το 2018 παραμένει ως ομότιμος καθηγητής. Ανάμεσα στα βιβλία του είναι: Εισαγωγή στη νεότερη ελληνική λογοτεχνία (1996)· Γιώργος Σεφέρης: περιμένοντας τον άγγελο (2003)· Ο πόλεμος του Μπάιρον: ρομαντική εξέγερση, Ελληνική Επανάσταση (2016) και Ελλάδα: Βιογραφία ενός σύγχρονου έθνους (2020). Το 2019 του επέδωσε ο Πρόεδρος της Ελληνικής Δημοκρατίας το παράσημο του Ταξιάρχη του Τάγματος της Τιμής, «για την εμβληματική συμβολή [του] στην έρευνα της Νεοελληνικής και Βυζαντινής Ιστορίας, Γλώσσας και Λογοτεχνίας». Εκλέχτηκε στη θέση A.G. Leventis Visiting Professor in Greek στο Πανεπιστήμιο του Εδιμβούργου για την περίοδο Σεπτέμβρη-Δεκέμβρη 2021. Το επόμενο βιβλίο του, The Greeks: A Global History προβλέπεται να κυκλοφορήσει το φθινόπωρο του 2021.

 

Roderick Beaton grew up in Edinburgh and studied English Literature at Peterhouse, Cambridge, before turning to Modern Greek as the subject of his doctorate, also at Cambridge – and at the British School at Athens. After a three-year postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Birmingham he embarked on a long career at King’s College London, first as Lecturer in Modern Greek Language and Literature (1981-88), later as Koraes Professor of Modern Greek and Byzantine History, Language and Literature (1988-2018), and since then as Emeritus. From 2012 to 2018 he also served as Director of the Centre for Hellenic Studies at King’s.

    Roderick is the author of many books and articles about aspects of the Greek-speaking world from the twelfth century to the present day, including An Introduction to Modern Greek Literature (1994); George Seferis: Waiting for the Angel. A Biography (2003); Byron’s War: Romantic Rebellion, Greek Revolution (2013); and Greece: Biography of a Modern Nation (2019, now a Penguin paperback). All four of these books won the prestigious Runciman Award for best book on the Hellenic world. His latest book, an overview of Greek history from the Bronze Age to the 200th anniversary of the Greek Revolution in 2021, is expected to be published in autumn 2021 with the title The Greeks: A Global History.

    He is a Fellow of the British Academy (FBA, 2013), a Fellow of King’s College (FKC, 2018), Commander of the Order of Honour of the Hellenic Republic (2019) and, from September to December 2021, has been appointed A.G. Leventis Visiting Professor in Greek at the University of Edinburgh.

Contact: marangouatkings@gmail.com or chs@kcl.ac.uk


Friday 22 October

The Greek War of Independence in the Visual Arts and Literature

Venue TBC

The Greek War of Independence in the Visual Arts and Literature

Episode from the Greek War of Independence (1856) by Eugène Delacroix

Event integrated into the Being Human Festival at Cambridge.

Speakers: Aris Sarafianos (University of Ioannina), Dimitris Plantzos (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens), Christina Dounia (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens)

Moderator and Chair: Liana Giannakopoulou (Cambridge)

Speaker abstracts and bios:

Aris Sarafianos on ‘The Shifting Sands of Philhellenism and the First English Portraits of Byron: From “Preposterous Liberalism” to the “Excuse” of Freedom’

Lord Byron’s first emblematic portraits – Portrait of a Nobleman in the Dress of an Albanian (1814) and Portrait of a Nobleman (1814) and their many copies – remain largely under-researched. These portraits have been painted by the Royal Academy painter Thomas Phillips, whose important yet unusual work in the Romantic portraiture of men of science, medical men, and celebrity writers and poets is largely overlooked, too. The proposed talk aims to place Byron’s portraits in their immediate historical context, highlighting and enriching the disparate set of competing motives, expectations and practices that defined the history of European Philhellenism and, in particular, the Byronic case. It studies the specific conditions of the portraits’ production, public exhibition and critical reception, their visual choices and perpetual reinterpretation by engaged viewers. The following themes encapsulate some of the significant forces present in these portraits that proved decisive for the spread of the attraction of Greece among the contemporary elite: the quest of celebrity status in the cultural market of the time; sensationalism, disguise, notoriety, and the pursuit of perpetual sensory stimulation in the construction of new models of dynamic virility and artistic identity; exotic fantasies and orientalist hybridizations.

    In a happy coincidence, ten years after the appearance of Byron’s portraits, there also appeared an extraordinary yet largely unknown literary portrait of the poet written by the most brilliant essayist and critic of the first half of the nineteenth century, William Hazlitt. In addition to being Byron’s associate, this well-known member of the Cockney School of literature had already been one of the first critics to review Phillips’ portraits of Byron exhibited at the Royal Academy exhibition of 1814. Hazlitt’s bottom-up literary portrait unpicks in a most biting way all the social, political and aesthetic forces that marked Byron’s ‘preposterous liberalism’ and related version of philhellenism. Ultimately, Hazlitt’s essay spots all the conflicting oscillations characteristic of Byron’s philhellenic model: passages across aristocratic forms of distinction and the love of people, class privilege and social equality, politeness and wildness, haughtiness and self-contempt, ennui and freedom that throw a new critical-historical light upon Phillips’ portraits and the history of philhellenism, more broadly.

Dimitris Plantzos on ‘Public Statues, National Anniversaries, and the Winters of Our Discontent’

As a typical modern nation-state, Greece has to a great extent based its public imagery on the usual repertoire of bronze and marble effigies representing its founding fathers: late nineteenth- and twentieth-century politicians, some ancient Greeks, and a great number of ‘heroes’ associated with the War of Independence. Inspired by an ongoing effort by the municipality of Tripoli in the Peloponnese to revamp the town’s central square where a bronze statue of Theodoros Kolokotronis was erected in the 1930s, as well as several graffiti attacks against the twin effigies of the same historical figure in Athens and Nafplio in the years of the economic recession and the covid19 pandemic, this paper revisits questions of public space, cultural memory, national heterotopias, and Greek Archaeopolitics.

    

Dimitris Plantzos is Professor of Classical Archaeology at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. His academic interests include Greek art and archaeology, archaeological theory, and modern receptions of classical antiquity. His most recent books are The Art of Painting in Ancient Greece (Athens and Atlanta, GA 2018) and The Recent Future: Classical Antiquity as Biopolitical Apparatus (Athens 2016; in Greek). He is currently working on a book on Archaeopolitics, to be published by Sorbonne Université Presses (in French).

Christina Dounia on ‘The Revolution of 1821 and Greek Surrealism: Poetry and Art’

This lecture is about the nationally and ideologically influential symbols and characters used by Greek surrealists to depict the historically significant event of the Revolution of 1821. The central question of my research is to what extent poets and artists, such as Empeirikos, Egonopoulos, Elytis, or Gatsos, are compliant or subversive with regards to the dominant standards and themes of the time. Using a parallel, yet often intersecting narrative, we can further discuss the depiction of 1821 in the paintings of Egonopoulos and the Naive artist Theofilos, whose works were discovered and disseminated throughout Europe by the editor of the surrealistic journal Minotaure, E. Teriade.

    

Christina Dounia is Professor Emerita of Modern Greek Literature at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. She holds a PhD from the University of Thessaloniki (Philology, 1988). She has worked as a Senior Lecturer at the Hellenic Open University, as an Assistant Professor at the University of Crete, and as an Associate Professor at the University of Ioannina. She was a literary critic of the periodical Anti (1984-1987), and she is currently a member of the Greek Society of Comparative Literature and the Society of Greek Writers. Among her books in Greek are: Literature and Politics in between the Two World Wars: Leftist Literary Revues/Reviews (Kastaniotis, 1996), K.G. Karyotiakis: The Resistance of an Independent Art (Kastaniotis, 2000), Dora Rozetti, ‘Her Mistress’ (literary editor and essay, Metaichmio, 2005), Petros Pikros: The Limits and the Transgression of Naturalism (Gavriilidis, 2006), Captivated by E. A. Poe’s Writing (Gavriilidis, 2019), Nikos Kazantzakis, ‘The Holy Mount Athos’ (literary editor and introduction, Iraklio: Kazantzaki Museum, 2020), Argonauts and Companions: The Literary Field in the 1930s (Estia, 2020). Christina Dounia has also published articles and writings on her research in history of the Modern Greek literature, 20th-century poetry and prose, comparative literature, and the relationship between ideology and aesthetics, which have appeared in various conference proceedings, periodicals, and edited books. In 2000 she was honoured with the National Essay Award, and in 2016 with the Essay Award of Academy of Athens.

Contact: Liana Giannakopoulou (Senior Research Fellow, Faculty of MMLL and Centre for Greek Studies, University of Cambridge)


Thursday 28 October, 16.00-17.30

Panel: The Geopolitics of Greece

Hellenic Observatory, LSE

Online

The Geopolitics of Greece: Continuities and Discontinuities

Geopolitics has always been invoked as an explanation for Greek foreign policy and its position in the European and broader international order. This event will examine to what extent the intersection of geography and politics accounts for Greece’s external relations and to what extent it provides a useful link in understanding Greece’s international position in 1821 and the 21st Century.

Speakers: Konstantina Botsiou (Associate Professor and Director of KEDIS, University of the Peloponnese), Erik Goldstein (Professor of International Relations and History, Boston University), George Prevelakis (Professor Emeritus, Sorbonne University; Permanent Representative of Greece at the OECD)

Chair: Spyros Economides (Associate Professor in International Relations and European Politics, LSE)

For more information, see the event website.

Registrations will open on 7 October.

Contact the Hellenic Observatory.


Friday 29 October

2021 Leventis Exhibition

University of Edinburgh Library, George Square, Edinburgh

2021 Leventis Exhibition: ‘Edina/Athena: The Greek Revolution and the Athens of the North, 1821–2021’

This major exhibition accompanies the tenure of the 12th Leventis Professor and will be on display from 29 October 2021 until 29 January 2022.

The display explores Scottish–Greek connections in the early nineteenth century and plays on the synchronicity of the Greek Revolution and the emergence of the discourse of Edinburgh as the ‘Modern Athens’ and ‘Athens of the North’.


Tuesday 2 November

Panel: Why 1821?

UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies

Why 1821? The Origins of the Greek War of Independence

Focuses on the early historical background and Balkan dimensions to the Greek War of Independence.

Chair: Wendy Bracewell, Professor of South-East European History at SSEES

Speakers: Richard Clogg, Viron Karidis, George Frangos, Dr Alex Drace-Francis (University of Amsterdam)

Contact: Prof. Richard Clogg


Saturday 6 November, 11.00

Cavafy Walking Tour

Meeting Point: Queensborough Terrace, Bayswater

Register by Email

Historic Walking Tour of Cavafy’s London

Follow in the footsteps of Cavafy on this London walking tour led by Dr Victoria Solomonidis-Hunter FKC (UCL).

Tour highlights include the Cavafy’s childhood home, the George Cavafy family home, the Aghia Sofia, the former site of the Hellenic College, and the studio of Cavafy’s cousin, Maria Zambaco Cassavetti.

To register for this free event, please email Centre for Hellenic Studies, KCL. As spaces are limited, registration is essential.


Thursday 18 – Sunday 21 November

Conference: A.G. Leventis Conference in Hellenic Studies

University of Edinburgh

Conference: Twelfth A.G. Leventis Conference in Hellenic Studies at the University of Edinburgh

The Greek Revolution of 1821: Contexts, Scottish Connections, the Classical Tradition.

Dugald Stewart Monument, Edinburgh

Accompanied by an exhibition in the University Library: ‘Edina/Athena: The Greek Revolution and the Athens of the North, 1821–2021’.

The revolution of the Greek-speaking, Orthodox Christian subjects of the Ottoman empire in 1821 was accompanied by declarations of national independence inspired by the recent revolutions in the Americas and France. The Greek Revolution was the first of its kind to be successful on European soil, and led to international recognition for Greece as an independent, sovereign state in 1830. In this way, the story of Greece as a modern nation-state begins, and also a new chapter in the history of our continent, as the era of multi-national empires slowly gave way, over the next two centuries, to an era dominated by the self-determination of nation-states.

This conference, held under the auspices of the A. G. Leventis Visiting Professorship in Greek, and forming part of Edinburgh’s biennial series of international conferences on Hellenic studies, will bring together scholars from many countries and a range of academic disciplines to re-assess the nature and significance of the Greek Revolution from the perspective of the twenty-first century and of a city and a nation that geographically lie at the opposite end of Europe from Greece, and have often been compared; namely Edinburgh (the ‘Athens of the North’) and Scotland.

In keeping with the broad remit of the Leventis series of conferences at Edinburgh, speakers will assess the role of the ancient and Byzantine Greek past in the causes, ideology, and reception of the 1821 revolution. The conference will also highlight Scottish connections to Greece, both ancient and modern, and specifically the Greek past as an inspiration for the Scottish Enlightenment and in the architectural planning of Edinburgh’s ‘New Town’.

Conference website here.

Contacts: Prof. Niels Gaul and Prof. Roderick Beaton

Prof. Roderick Beaton, A.G. Leventis Visiting Professor in Greek

Roderick Beaton grew up in Edinburgh and studied English Literature at Peterhouse, Cambridge, before turning to Modern Greek as the subject of his doctorate, also at Cambridge – and at the British School at Athens. After a three-year postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Birmingham he embarked on a long career at King’s College London, first as Lecturer in Modern Greek Language and Literature (1981-88), later as Koraes Professor of Modern Greek and Byzantine History, Language and Literature (1988-2018), and since then as Emeritus. From 2012 to 2018 he also served as Director of the Centre for Hellenic Studies at King’s.

    Roderick is the author of many books and articles about aspects of the Greek-speaking world from the twelfth century to the present day, including An Introduction to Modern Greek Literature (1994); George Seferis: Waiting for the Angel. A Biography (2003); Byron’s War: Romantic Rebellion, Greek Revolution (2013); and Greece: Biography of a Modern Nation (2019, now a Penguin paperback). All four of these books won the prestigious Runciman Award for best book on the Hellenic world. His latest book, an overview of Greek history from the Bronze Age to the 200th anniversary of the Greek Revolution in 2021, is expected to be published in autumn 2021 with the title The Greeks: A Global History.

    He is a Fellow of the British Academy (FBA, 2013), a Fellow of King’s College (FKC, 2018), Commander of the Order of Honour of the Hellenic Republic (2019) and, from September to December 2021, has been appointed A.G. Leventis Visiting Professor in Greek at the University of Edinburgh.


Friday 26 November, 18.00

Panel: Lord Guilford and his Ionian Academy

Royal Holloway, University of London

Online

Lord Guilford and his Ionian Academy

Lord Guilford’s statue on Corfu

This panel discussion takes as its point of departure the famous Ionian Academy established by the great Philhellene Frederick North, 5th Earl of Guildford (1766-1827). The Ionian Academy was the first university established on Greek soil (1824-1827). The speakers will explore the history and tradition of the intellectual movements that led to the liberation of the Greeks, including the contribution of the Cypriots and the Greek communities in Britain, Europe and Russia.

Coordinator: Paris Papamichos Chronakis (Lecturer in Modern Greek History, Royal Holloway, University of London)

Speakers: Professor Sakis Gekas (Associate Professor and Hellenic Heritage Foundation Chair of Modern Greek History, York University, Canada) and others (TBA).

Contact: Dr Charalambos Dendrinos, Director, The Hellenic Institute, RHUL.


Friday 26 November

Gilbert Murray Lecture

University of Glasgow

Fifth Gilbert Murray Lecture on Internationalism and Classics

Lecturer: A.E.Stallings (title TBC)

The triennial Gilbert Murray Lectures on Internationalism and Classics are established in honour of Prof. Gilbert Murray, one of the founding spirits of the League of Nations and Professor of Ancient Greek at Glasgow, London and Oxford universities. The lecture rotates between the three university cities where Murray had a chair. From 1914 onwards, Murray was active in propagating the ideals of internationalism and promoting the concept of the League of Nations. He also had close contacts with the Greek communities of the UK and their representatives in London. The 2021 lecturer will be the poet and classicist, A. E. Stallings. The 2021 lecture will take place within the framework of the UK bicentennial celebrations. Further information will be available in due course. See also https://gilbertmurraytrust.org.uk.


Friday 10 – Saturday 11 December

Conference: Byron, Philhellenism in Literature, the Arts, and Scholarship

KCL

Conference: Byron, Philhellenism in Literature, the Arts, and Scholarship

In honour of Roderick Beaton, Emeritus Koraes Professor of Modern Greek and Byzantine History, Language and Literature.

Including a celebratory reception and book launch of Roddy Beaton’s 2021 book The Greeks: A Global History.

Contact: Prof. Gonda Van Steen

Prof. Roderick Beaton, Emeritus Koraes Professor of Modern Greek and Byzantine History, Language and Literature

Roderick Beaton grew up in Edinburgh and studied English Literature at Peterhouse, Cambridge, before turning to Modern Greek as the subject of his doctorate, also at Cambridge – and at the British School at Athens. After a three-year postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Birmingham he embarked on a long career at King’s College London, first as Lecturer in Modern Greek Language and Literature (1981-88), later as Koraes Professor of Modern Greek and Byzantine History, Language and Literature (1988-2018), and since then as Emeritus. From 2012 to 2018 he also served as Director of the Centre for Hellenic Studies at King’s.

    Roderick is the author of many books and articles about aspects of the Greek-speaking world from the twelfth century to the present day, including An Introduction to Modern Greek Literature (1994); George Seferis: Waiting for the Angel. A Biography (2003); Byron’s War: Romantic Rebellion, Greek Revolution (2013); and Greece: Biography of a Modern Nation (2019, now a Penguin paperback). All four of these books won the prestigious Runciman Award for best book on the Hellenic world. His latest book, an overview of Greek history from the Bronze Age to the 200th anniversary of the Greek Revolution in 2021, is expected to be published in autumn 2021 with the title The Greeks: A Global History.

    He is a Fellow of the British Academy (FBA, 2013), a Fellow of King’s College (FKC, 2018), Commander of the Order of Honour of the Hellenic Republic (2019) and, from September to December 2021, has been appointed A.G. Leventis Visiting Professor in Greek at the University of Edinburgh.


Late Spring 2022

Historic Walking Tour

Date and Meeting Point TBC

Historic Walking Tour of Greece-Related Sites and Sights in London

Tour of the West Norwood Greek Orthodox Cemetery and the Greek Orthodox Cathedral (neoclassical graves of famous Greeks, such as the Rallis family from Chios, the Vallianos family, etc.). Contacts: Konstantinos Trimmis and Gonda Van Steen.

The announcement of Lord Byron’s death by the provisional Greek government

Events Calendar

View past events here

%d bloggers like this: